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Archive for the ‘comics’ Category

Joe Quesada announced that the new Captain America is Sam Wilson.  Since we called Bucky “Bucky Cap,” might I suggest “Captain SAmerica” for Sam’s nickname?

I hope this new incarnation of Cap gets a better writer.

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❝ Two days ago a report hit the web stating that The Fantastic Four “won’t be based on any history of anything already published.” This was a quote translated from Esquire LatinoAmerica and said by Sue Storm / Invisible Woman actor Kate Mara.

Seems like Mara either made a mistake and said something wrong, or something she said didn’t translate properly. Either way, fans of Marvel’s first family immediately took to social media and began complaining about the reboot. ❞

Read the full article here at Daily Superhero.

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I have never been terribly interested in Thor as a title.  It just isn’t my sort of genre.  But today Marvel announced the next worthy person to wield Mjolnir will be a woman and it caught my attention.   My Dad’s a longtime Thor fan and I’m sure he’ll have some huffing and puffing to do (just like he did when Bucky picked up the mantle of Captain America).  I get it.  Change is tough for fans who’ve read and loved a character for years.  It’s hard to see the characters you’ve grown attached to get shunted off to the side (my heart goes out to fans who love secondary characters).

Obviously, this is something Marvel’s had in the pipeline for a while.  I saw some comments on Twitter and Tumblr accusing Marvel of offering platitudes to female readers.  And of course there’s the deluge of male protest on Twitter and in the comments section on the above linked Marvel announcement (she’s already being called “Whor”).  The timing is certainly suspect on the heels of the #FireRickRemender controversy.  Reactions to the news run the gamut from excitement to wariness to calls to boycott the title and / or Marvel.

Writer Jason Aaron told Time:

If you’re a long-time Thor fan you know there’s kind of a tradition from time to time of somebody else picking up that hammer. Beta Ray Bill was a horse-faced alien guy who picked up the hammer. At one point Thor was a frog. So I think if we can accept Thor as a frog and a horse-faced alien, we should be able to accept a woman being able to pick up that hammer and wield it for a while, which surprisingly we’ve never really seen before.

This indicates Thor isn’t a person, per se, but a sort of power that can various people can possess “if they be worthy.”  Marvel has shown us several worthy characters who’ve picked up Thor’s hammer:  Beta Ray Bill, Storm, Captain America.  It isn’t so hard to imagine that some new person, a woman this time, can pick up the hammer and thus embody the power of Thor.  On its face, this isn’t a simple switching of anatomy.  It’s a new person having the power passed on to her.  (As I said, I’m not any sort of authority on Thor and these are all things I’ve discovered via some quick Google research.)

Wired posted a great article on why this new Thor is important (spoiler: it isn’t the lack of a penis and presence of a vagina).  The article speculates that the choice to take this route with Thor is due to the character’s visibility thanks to his appearance in three films in the MCU.  Perhaps it’s that sort of visibility that’s making now the right time for Sam Wilson to take up Cap’s shield.

Visibility is important.  Representation is important.  It’s why characters like T’Challa, Sam Wilson, Storm, Miles Morales, America Chavez, and Kamala Khan are so important.  It’s why female-led titles are so important.  I’m excited about Storm getting her own title and joining the ranks of Black Widow, Elektra, Captain Marvel, and Ms. Marvel in my pull-list.  But all the outcry from male readers who can’t imagine their favourite hero without genitalia that matches their own makes me wonder how much male readership those female-let titles have.  And then, at the end of the day, there’s the mean-spirited part of me that wants to laugh at them, to remind them that there are plenty of other titles they can read if it’s just oh-so-hard for them to take Thor seriously when she lacks a penis.  Oops.

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❝ Comics has an outrage problem.

I don’t mean people getting up in arms over things, either. That’s an issue unto itself, and like anything else, it could be better than it currently is in several different ways, but that’s not today’s conversation.

What I’m talking about is how we—the comics community—describe, talk about, and address the concerns of people who are upset about one thing or another. The way we talk about outrage fatigue, outrage-of-the-week, faux outrage, outrage-o-matic, misplaced outrage, another outrage, this outrage, that outrage, and why it’s gross and short-sighted. How we use “tumblr” as a pejorative but ignore the poison in our own forums and followers.

The way we use the word outrage suggests that the outrage in question is fake and irrational, on account of being poorly thought-out and overly emotional. It happens every time someone brings up a point to do with equality, sexism, racism, or justice. It’s the same tactic the music media uses to devalue Kanye’s rants. They’re invalid, an inconvenience, annoying, or fake because you can see the emotions driving it, and emotional reactions aren’t valid.

We use the presence of passion to first diminish and then dismiss arguments. The offended must play by the rules of the unoffended, or even worse, the offenders, in order to be heard. You have to tamp down that pain if you want to get help or fix it. You can see it when people say things like “Thank you for being civil” when arguing something heated with someone they disagree with. Civility is great, sure, but we’re forcing people who feel like they’re under attack to meet us on our own terms. In reality, passion shouldn’t be dismissed. Passion has a purpose. ❞

Read the rest of David Brothers’ Beyond Outrage on his blog.

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On one hand, I’m excited that we’re getting a new Bucky solo title in October.  I was sad when Jason Latour’s Winter Soldier title was cancelled.  For reasons I’m sure are clear to anyone who’s looked at this blog, I was less than thrilled back with Bitter March was announced and declined to buy it (from what I’ve heard, I’m not missing out on much).  So, yes, I’m happy to see my favourite character get his own title again, especially in the wake of Captain America: The Winter Soldier‘s success.

On the other hand, Bucky Barnes: space explorer?  Not really my jam.  There’s a reason I don’t read the space adventure sorts of comics (like Thor or Guardians of the Galaxy).  I’m not really in love with Ales Kot’s work on Secret Avengers, either, though that could very well be more my lack of interest in the title’s current line-up than any defect in Kot’s writing.  I’m also more than a little bummed that Latour won’t be returning to Bucky’s story.  I think there are better ways to develop Bucky than by turning him into Buck Rogers.

Oh well.  I’ll give it a chance because I love Bucky Barnes and Marco Rudy’s illustrating.  I’m going to try to reserve forming any thoughts until the comic’s out.  For the time being, I’ll keep my expectations low (all the better for pleasant surprises, right?).  I’m just glad Bucky’s getting another shot at his own title.

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Feminist Dragons

What is it with dudes and their never-ending cry of “Diversity! Diversity! Diversity!” ? Ugh, it doesn’t MATTER what the characters are like! Only the story matters! And we all know that those fanboys love to complain about how there’s no representation of LGBT (or are they calling it GLBT now? IT’S SO HARD TO KEEP TRACK OF LETTERS) or not-white people.

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❝ I’d like to clear the air.

The past 96 hours have been some of the most stressful, anxious, and rewarding of my life.

Wednesday evening, following my first read of Rick Remender’s Captain America #22, I posted a series of entries to my blog reiterating my distaste for his work, and my renewed (and long-held) belief that he should no longer be writing it.

In my haste and anger, I asked other people who shared my opinion to tweet Marvel Comics, Rick Remender, and Captain America editor Tom Brevoort with their concerns, using the hashtag #FireRickRemender.

And I’m sorry.

I understand that the hashtag, and the arguments held under its banner, could have been (and were) seen as personal attacks. And for that, I apologize. I was coming from a place of upset, discomfort, disgust, and outrage, and I acted solely from that place.

I am genuinely sorry for any personal affront my actions may have caused.

What I am not sorry for is everything that came afterward. 

Read Jackie’s story on Tumblr.

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